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20121202
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of the economy is for everyone to pay more in taxes and guarantee a form of public goods. the most successful democracy is where it is structured around universe albens where everyone pays in and makes use of what the state provides. now, no leaders are making that argument. in the short run, they are right not to. getting rid of the entirety of the bush tax cuts for all brackets hurts the recovery. once we are in the recovery, we have to do at least that and more. the question is, does the death of the consensus mean american voters are ready to hear that? how will this president or the next make the case? joining me today, governor of connecticut, a senior research fellow at george mason university. senior economic director at naacp and a fellow at the roosevelt institute. it's great to have you all here. i like when i do these spiels, listen to withering criticism from the panel. what do you think of the thesis, at least about the politics of the undoing of the consensus? >> i think this focus on grover is just it's wrong. i mean grover is just one guy advocating for a position that i thin
to slow walk the economy to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> the extremely vague republican proposal did not include an increase in tax rates a position he reiterated on friday making clear there's no movement on the white house's red line on treasury secretary tim geithner as he was asked about it wednesday. >> the administration's position when it comes to raising taxes on the wealthy. making more than $250,000. if republicans do not agree, is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> absolutely. >> there's no agreement that doesn't involve the rates going up on the top wealthy 2%. >> republicans clinging to what little leverage they have to maximize cuts zeroed in on the debt ceiling hoping for a repeat of the 2011 showdown where house republicans were able to extract $2 trillion in cuts. $1 trillion cut from domestic programs in ten years and $1.2 trillion in cuts through a sequester. wednesday, president obama seemed to set another red line, a business round table who warned against the repeat of last year's debacle. >> i want to send a clear message. we are not go
dicker, author of oil he's endless bid, taming the unreliable price of oil to secure our economy, a cnbc contributor and union blake director of strirmtal affairs for hometown energy group, independent energy consulting firm with clients in the oil and gas industry. republican senator rand paul of kentucky on wenz lambbaased the actress ashley judd report considering a run for senate there. he said her opposition to one industry in particular would doom her candidacy. >> she's way damn to liberal for our country and state. she hateses or big heest industry, coal. good luck bringing the i hate coal message to kentucky. >> it shows a misunderstanding of his own state's economy. according to data from the bureau of economic analysis, mining is only the 13th largest industry in kentucky by gdp. manufacturing is at the top of the list. if you go by jobs, mining is anl 15th in the state. health care is at the top of list with eight times the number of workers. paul's claiming are flat wrong, but they show a deep anxiety and defensiveness about the coal industry on the wane in america. today co
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)

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